The New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH) recently adopted a drinking water regulation that requires all public water systems to provide treatment for PFOA, PFOS and 1,4-dioxane. Taking a proactive stance, Garden City Park Water District (GCPWD) began taking steps to evaluate advanced water treatment technologies to address emerging contaminants beginning in mid-2018, well before the new standards were put in place.

Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) is the most technologically advanced treatment process and a proven solution that removes the compounds from drinking water. Construction of AOP reactors at Well 9 began in fall 2019, and at Well 6 in February 2020. Completion has made the wells compliant with New York State’s 1,4-dioxane regulations of a maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 1 part per billion; and for PFOA and PFOS at 10 parts per trillion.

All well sites throughout the District have Granular Activated Carbon (GAC), which removes certain chemicals, mostly organic, from water. Just 10 grams of granulated activated carbon (less than a third of an ounce), has a surface area equal to a standard NFL football field. That porosity is why GAC is ideal for eliminating emerging contaminants in water and that’s also why GCPWD has implemented this technology throughout the District.

“We have some of the most sophisticated water technology in the region,” said Commissioner Kenneth Borchers. “We brought our facilities up to the latest standards with the most advanced, state-of-the-art technology. By staying ahead of the curve, we were well prepared to meet the new standards before they were ever released.”

IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR DRINKING WATER

Deferral Issued for PFOA, PFOS and 1,4-Dioxane in the Garden City Park Water District

Why are you receiving this notice/information?

You are receiving this notice because testing of our public water system found the chemicals perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and 1,4-Dioxane in your drinking water above New York State’s maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 ppt for PFOA/PFOS and 1 ppb for 1,4-dioxane.The MCLs are set well below levels known to cause health effects in animal studies. Therefore, consuming water with PFOA, PFOS or 1,4-dioxane at the level detected does not pose a significant health risk. Your water continues to be acceptable for all uses.

The Garden City Park Water District has submitted, and the New York State Department of Health (Department) has issued, a deferral to the Garden City Park Water District. When a public water system is issued a deferral, the water system agrees to a schedule for corrective action and compliance with the new MCLs. In exchange, the Department agrees to defer enforcement actions, such as assessing fines, if the water district is meeting the established deadlines. We are required to update the Department and the Nassau County Department of Health each calendar quarter on the status of our projects. If we do not meet the agreed upon deadlines, the Department can resume enforcement.

What are the health effects of PFOA and PFOS?

The available information on the health effects associated with PFOA and PFOS, like many chemicals, comes from studies of high-level exposure in animals or humans. Less is known about the chances of health effects occurring from lower levels of exposure, such as those that might occur in drinking water. As a result, finding lower levels of chemicals in drinking water prompts water suppliers and regulators to take precautions that include notifying consumers and steps to reduce exposure.

PFOA and PFOS has caused a wide range of health effects when studied in animals that were exposed to high levels. Additional studies of high-level exposures of PFOA and PFOS in people provide evidence that some of the health effects seen in animals may also occur in humans. The most consistent findings in animals were effects on the liver and immune system and impaired fetal growth and development. The United States Environmental Protection Agency considers PFOA and PFOS as having suggestive evidence for causing cancer based on studies of animals exposed to high levels of this chemical over their entire lifetimes.

At the level of PFOA and PFOS detected in your water, exposure from drinking water and food preparation is well below PFOA and PFOS exposures associated with health effects.

 What are the health effects of 1,4-dioxane?

Laboratory studies show that 1,4-dioxane caused liver cancer in animals exposed at high levels throughout their lifetime. Other types of cancer have also been reported, although less consistently than liver cancer. There is no evidence of 1,4-dioxane cancer effects in humans. The United States Environmental Protection Agency considers 1,4-dioxane a likely human carcinogen based upon studies of animals exposed to high levels of this chemical over their entire lifetimes.

At the level of 1,4-dioxane detected in your water, exposure from drinking water and food preparation is well below 1,4-dioxane exposures associated with health effects.

What is New York State doing about PFOA, PFOS and 1,4-Dioxane in public drinking water?

The New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH) has adopted a drinking water regulation that requires all public water systems to test for PFOA, PFOS and 1,4-dioxane. If found above the MCLs, the water supplier must take steps to lower the level to meet the standard. Exceedances of the MCL signal that steps should be taken by the water system to reduce contaminant levels.

What is being done to remove these contaminants?

The Garden City Park Water District began to take the initial steps to evaluate advanced water treatment technologies addressing these new contaminants beginning in mid-2018, nearly a year before the State proposed these regulations. Of the six District wells, two were demonstrated to be operating with existing treatment in compliance with the new regulations. New treatment at two additional wells was approved to operate in October 2020. The District has restricted the remaining two wells until treatment for 1,4-Dioxane, PFOA and PFOS has been installed and is approved to operate. Additional information will be shared as further testing and progress occurs. This process is similar for any chemical detected in public drinking water that requires mitigation. The compliance timetable will ensure that your drinking water will meet the MCL as rapidly as possible. The deferral is effective until June 25, 2022.

Where can I get more information?

For more information, please contact the Garden City Park Water District at 516-746-3194 or 333 Marcus Ave., Garden City Park, NY 11040.  You can also contact the Nassau County Department of Health at 516-227-9692.

If you have additional questions about these contaminants and your health, talk to your health care provider who is most familiar with your health history and can provide advice and assistance about understanding how drinking water may affect your personal health.

Public Water System ID# NY2902825

Date 01/25/2021

The New Norm. GCPWD employees Joe Renta (L) and Chris Tobin getting ready for the work day.

The impact of COVID-19 has created a seismic impact on each of our lives. While it is impossible to predict what the world will look like as we continue to fight through this pandemic, we at the Garden City Park Water District continue to provide the essential service of delivering an uninterrupted water supply to our customers throughout the District, and our water continues to be in compliance with all federal, New York State and Nassau County regulations.

“While our offices remain closed to the general public to protect the health and safety of our staff and customers, we continue to work and adhere to the conditions and mandates of the state of emergency,” stated Water Commissioner Peter Chimenti. The District has taken numerous precautionary measures to protect the health of all personnel, including the enforcement of social distancing and the use of masks and gloves. Chimenti added, “Our offices are cleaned and disinfected daily, as well the District fleet of vehicles.”

It’s important to inform you that our water supply remains unaffected by the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the World Health Organization have confirmed that the COVID-19 virus is not waterborne and that the standard disinfection done by water suppliers as regular practices are an effective method for inactivating the COVID-19 virus.

Increased Revenue Will Fund Various Infrastructure Upgrades to Improve Water Quality and Distribution System Resiliency

The Garden City Park Water District would like to notify its customers that a rate adjustment will be implemented beginning the 4th billing quarter of 2019. The additional revenue will help the District pay for past, current and future infrastructure projects needed to ensure the health and safety of the water supply. The rate adjustment also means the District will remain within the two percent tax cap.

The District works continuously to provide residents of our community with the highest quality water at the lowest possible cost. The costs of running a water district continue to climb as we are met with increased operational challenges and more stringent testing parameters. We are always working to maximize efficiencies, identifying areas for cost savings while maintaining our unwavering commitment to the health and safety of our water supply and distribution system.

A thorough review of the present water rate structure and property taxes with respect to the fiscal needs of the District was conducted to determine the amount of revenue needed to make ends meet. In order to remain within the two percent tax cap and maintain a high level of service and reliability in regards to the critical drinking water infrastructure, an increase to water rates was necessary. Below, you will find a three year step program:

Year 1

Residential: 2019

  • Minimum quarterly bill (up to 10 thousand gallons): New rate $14
  • $1.90 per thousand gallons after initial 10 thousand gallons

Commercial: 2019

  • Minimum quarterly bill (up to 20 thousand gallons): New rate $50
  • $2.50 per thousand gallons after initial 20 thousand gallons

Year 2

Residential: 2020

  • Minimum quarterly bill (up to 10 thousand gallons): New rate $16
  • $2.20 per thousand gallons after initial 10 thousand gallons

Commercial: 2020

  • Minimum quarterly bill (up to 20 thousand gallons): New rate $55
  • $2.75 per thousand gallons after initial 20 thousand gallons

Year 3

Residential: 2021

  • Minimum quarterly bill (up to 10 thousand gallons): New rate $18
  • $2.50 per thousand gallons after initial 10 thousand gallons

Commercial: 2021

  • Minimum quarterly bill (up to 10 thousand gallons): New rate $60
  • $3.00 per thousand gallons after initial 20 thousand gallons

 

The new rate structure will take effect on the 4th quarter bill received by all customers. The following schedule shows when your increase will take effect:

  • Accounts beginning with 01, 02, 03 and 04 will see increase on October, 2019 bill
  • Accounts beginning with 05, 06, 07 and 08 will see increase on November, 2019 bill
  • Accounts beginning with 09, 10, 11 and 12 will see increase on December, 2019 bill

We are always striving to cut costs where appropriate and maximize economies of scale, but the rising costs for infrastructure and operations are simply outpacing our ability to reduce spending. Maintaining old and building new infrastructure on top of the costs of each year is not cheap. However, we are thankful our residents understand these increasing challenges and continue to support our effort to supply the Garden City Park Water District community with a safe and reliable water system.

Sincerely,

Garden City Park Water/Fire District

 

 

 

 

 

It all starts with the facts of water production on Long Island. The water that you use day in and day out for every purpose originates far below our surface and is drawn from the Magothy Aquifer.

Pictured Left to Right: Garden City Park Water District Water
Commissioners Chris Engel, Kenneth
Borchers and Peter Chimenti.

The Water Commissioners that you elect to manage the District are your neighbors, and they live right here in the community they serve. It’s the responsibility of the Commissioners to be fiscally sound and protect local taxpayers. Annual voting for Water Commissioners ensure that your investment is in safe hands with local control.

Your water rate is less than two percent of your Nassau County residential taxes. The monies collected by Garden City Park Water District are used for water production, operations and maintenance by this District and this District alone. Funds are not redirected for some other non-water-related project. What comes in, stays in!

The reality is that through local control, each community has responsibly financed and regulated its own water supply for many years. The fact is, progress and improvement have come promptly and appropriately without the bureaucratic disadvantages associated with massive political governing bodies. Garden City Park Water District operates 24/7/365 with a staff of 12 serving 18,000 people.

To that end, GCPWD Water Commissioners provide an indispensable service of delivering high quality, potable water to households and businesses within the District. It takes dedication and hard work, and we will continue to do everything possible to guarantee the highest quality water at the lowest possible cost.